Newsweek (11/25, Firger) reports that researchpublished in the American Journal of Epidemiology suggests that “women who experience premenstrual syndrome (PMS) may be more likely to develop hypertension…later in life.” Investigators “found women who reported significant PMS symptoms—such as mood swings, lethargy, food cravings and breast tenderness—were as much as 40 percent more likely to develop high blood pressure 20 years later than those who did not.”

        HealthDay (11/25, Preidt) reports that the association “between moderate-to-severe PMS and high blood pressure was strongest among women younger than 40.”