Facebook struggling to stop spread of anti-vaccine misinformation

Facebook struggling to stop spread of anti-vaccine misinformation

The Washington Post (2/13, Telford) reports “Facebook is facing challenges combating widespread misinformation about vaccinations on its platform, which has become a haven for the anti-vaccination movement.” The company is struggling to address the situation because “the bulk of anti-vaccination content doesn’t violate Facebook’s community guidelines for inciting ‘real-world harm,’ according to a spokesperson.” Still, “Wendy Sue Swanson, a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and spokeswoman for the American Academy of Pediatrics, recently met with Facebook strategists about dealing with public health issues, including misinformation about vaccines, on the platform.” She “said that it’s not Facebook’s job to police the dialogue around immunizations, but rather to make sure users have ample access to scientifically valid content.”

Screen time at ages two, three linked to development at ages three and five

Screen time at ages two, three linked to development at ages three and five

Reuters (1/28, Rapaport) reports, “Toddlers who spend too much time in front of televisions, tablets, and smartphones may not become as skilled at problem-solving, communication and other skills needed for school as their peers who have less screen time,” research indicated.

CNN (1/28, Howard) reports researchers “found a direct association between screen time at ages two and three and development at three and five.” The findings were published online in JAMA Pediatrics.

Common Sense Media, a non-profit promoting educational programming in all media formats, has compiled a list of Best TV for Families and also includes lists for movies, apps, and games.

About half of adults do not know the most common symptoms of heart attack

About half of adults do not know the most common symptoms of heart attack

U.S. News & World Report (2/7, Galvin) reports that although “most people know what to do if they see someone having a heart attack – call 911 – about half of adults don’t know the five most common symptoms, according to a survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” Additionally, “awareness also varied by demographic group and cardiovascular risk, highlighting the need for targeted interventions for these groups, researchers said.” The CDC has a webpage listing the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

Sedentary behavior may increase risk of early onset colorectal cancer, study indicates

Sedentary behavior may increase risk of early onset colorectal cancer, study indicates

NBC News (2/5, Charles) reports on a study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum that has “identified sedentary behavior as a potential risk factor to explain the sharp rise in colorectal cancer among those under 50,” which NBC says is a “first.” The study, adds NBC, “looked at TV viewing as well as other sedentary behavior in nearly 90,000 American women, [and] found that more than one hour of daily TV viewing was associated with a 12 percent increase in risk of colorectal cancer,” while “watching more than two hours per day,” was linked to “a striking 70 percent increase in risk.”