More exercise after heart attack linked to lower mortality rates, study suggests

More exercise after heart attack linked to lower mortality rates, study suggests

Reuters (1/7, Rapaport) reports that research suggests “heart attack survivors who step up their exercise efforts may live longer than those who remain inactive.” Investigators found that “compared to patients who were inactive for the first 10 to 12 months after their heart attack, patients who were active during that whole time were 71 percent less likely to die during the four-year study.” The findings were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Social media, depression connection found in teen girls

Social media, depression connection found in teen girls


CNN (1/4)
  Teen girls and boys who used social media more than five hours daily had 50% and 35% higher depressive symptoms, respectively, compared with peers who had one to three hours of daily social media use, indicating a stronger link between social media use and depression among girls, UK researchers reported in the journal EClinicalMedicine.

Seniors in single-story homes more likely to age in place, study indicates

Seniors in single-story homes more likely to age in place, study indicates

Reuters (1/1, Christ) reports a study from Johns Hopkins University found “having a one-floor house or having the kitchen, bedroom and bathroom on one floor were the features most strongly associated with aging in place,” while elevators or lifts also encouraged aging in place. Housing design alterations may be considered before the need arises. Jon Pynoos of the University of Southern California offered an example: “In a home with two or more stories, stacking closets that could later be replaced with a small elevator might be a good investment.” The study was published in Journals of Gerontology: Social Sciences.

Low cardiorespiratory fitness in men tied to higher risk of stroke, study indicates

Low cardiorespiratory fitness in men tied to higher risk of stroke, study indicates

Reuters (12/31, Crist) reported researchers found that men with low cardiorespiratory fitness are more likely to have a stroke than those with higher fitness. Investigators “in Norway followed 2,014 middle-aged men for more than 20 years.” The researchers found that “those who were unfit for the whole study period, or who started out fit but became less so, were twice as likely to have a stroke as those who stayed fit or became fit.” The findings were published in Stroke.