Whole grains may reduce liver cancer risk, study suggests

Whole grains may reduce liver cancer risk, study suggests

Reuters (2/21, Carroll) reports a long-term analysis studying over 125,000 adults for around 24 years found the risk for liver cancer was 37 percent lower among those who consumed the most whole grains. The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

Being active in middle age appears to lower risk for dementia in women

Being active in middle age appears to lower risk for dementia in women

TIME (2/20, Park) reports that researchers have found that “mentally stimulating activities and physical exercise can independently lower people’s chances of developing many types of dementia, as well as Alzheimer’s disease.”

HealthDay (2/20, Thompson) reports that researchers also found that “higher levels of physical activity reduced the risk of more vascular forms of dementia, regardless of how mentally active the women were,” whereas greater “levels of mental activity in midlife reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, regardless of how physically active the women were.” The findings were published online in Neurology.

More exercise after heart attack linked to lower mortality rates, study suggests

More exercise after heart attack linked to lower mortality rates, study suggests

Reuters (1/7, Rapaport) reports that research suggests “heart attack survivors who step up their exercise efforts may live longer than those who remain inactive.” Investigators found that “compared to patients who were inactive for the first 10 to 12 months after their heart attack, patients who were active during that whole time were 71 percent less likely to die during the four-year study.” The findings were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Social media, depression connection found in teen girls

Social media, depression connection found in teen girls


CNN (1/4)
  Teen girls and boys who used social media more than five hours daily had 50% and 35% higher depressive symptoms, respectively, compared with peers who had one to three hours of daily social media use, indicating a stronger link between social media use and depression among girls, UK researchers reported in the journal EClinicalMedicine.